Global Warming Essays | Custom College Essays

Tuesday, July 31, 2018 2:42:31 AM






My old friend ‘Cross the Green Mountain by Bob Dylan an analysis | All ninety-five year-old weeping willow tree is growing in my front yard. It stands perfectly centered in between my house, and my in-ground swimming pool. The base of its trunk leaves the ground at a slight angle, giving the impression that it’s leaning forward. The surrounding ground is uneven and bumpy with roots weaving in and out of the earth, as if they are seeking a breath of fresh air. Unlike the rough and deeply grooved surface usually associated with trees; my tree’s bark is smoother, and pimple like with sections scaling off in sheets. The actual trunk is only eight feet tall, and not very wide, but the height and span of the branches shoot out Essay prompts John Steinbeck s The Pea - 223 Words twice that size, making it top-heavy. Although not an enormous tree, it dominates the nearby scenery. As the oldest and wisest vegetation, it demands seniority from the surrounding landscape. Over the course of one year, my weeping willow tree takes on multiple faces, demonstrating the circle of life. During the winter months, the willow tree is gray and lifeless. Having been stripped of everything, its limbs are barren and jagged. Frozen in place, they stiffly poke out into the air, and are reluctant to sway even for a harsh winter wind. The tree appears dry and brittle. The birds no longer favor it for shelter. They have abandoned their previous home for the pine trees on my neighbor’s property. The tree elicits a cold, and 2 sad feeling. It is physically present, yet somehow absent at the same time. Unlike death, this is a temporary state. The tree remains silent and still during this brief hibernation. As the season shifts into spring, the willow tree slowly comes back to life. Previous Cost of the Ebola Epidemic | 2014-2016 Outbreak West of gray change to various shades of vivid color. Branches pregnant with bright green buds announce its return. It extends its appendages into the gentle breezes, as if stretching from a long nap. Eager to gain strength, thirsty roots drink springtime.

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